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By: W. Curtis Wiberg

As part of a Denver divorce or custody case, the Court may be asked to make determinations concerning child support and alimony (spousal support). The most significant consideration in these determinations is each party’s income. While it is often easy to just look at the most recent paychecks or W-2 of each party and plug those numbers into the child support and/or maintenance guideline calculations, when one party is not working, not working full-time, or not working at an employment/income level that is consistent with his/her capabilities, the income issue becomes much more interesting and complicated. Experienced attorneys will understand the intricacies that come when determining and proving income of in some cases.

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By Stephen J. Plog

“Should auld acquaintance be forgot? And never called to mind…,” the famous words from the classical, New Year’s musical standard. 2015 is gone; long reign 2016. In Colorado family law cases, there are various rules and concepts tied into the New Year which give couples and families things to think about in terms of finances, financial planning, childcare expenses, and other aspects of their cases.

Below are a few of the New Year-related topics that I, as an experienced Denver divorce attorney, have repeatedly advised clients about over the years:
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By Jessica Bryant

In many of the divorce, custody, and child support cases I have handled over the years, the question of expert witnesses has often arisen. There are different types of experts that may be relevant, necessary, or helpful, depending on the issues in dispute in your case. Ultimately, your experienced Colorado family law attorney is the best person to advise you as to what is the best fit for your case. For any case, there are experts that can be appointed by the court to complete certain tasks, and experts you can hire yourself to provide certain information.
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Divorce is difficult enough at any time of year, but it can be even more so around the holidays. In addition to the stress, anger, or sadness brought on by this major life change, it can be even more emotional to realize that celebrating the holidays may look very different from now on. Although the legal and personal process can make for turbulent times, it is important to remember that divorce does not define you, nor does it have the power to ruin your happiness.

Having helped numerous clients navigate their Colorado divorce proceedings, including during the holiday season, we’ve seen the common issues that arise and have learned how to best approach them. This holiday season, keep these thoughts in mind to help you get through the rough patches:
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By Sarah T. McCain

Often times, the topic of divorce is mentioned and thoroughly discussed in a home prior to either party taking any action to start the process. In those cases, the parties may have a good idea of the agreements they want to make between themselves. Those agreements may generally remain the same throughout the process and may ultimately be memorialized in their final Colorado divorce paperwork.
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By: W. Curtis Wiberg

All too often, in a deteriorating marriage, one spouse calls the police during a very heated argument that may have gotten physical or threatening and one spouse finds himself or herself arrested for a crime involving domestic violence (harassment, assault, criminal mischief, false imprisonment). Once released on bond, that spouse is then often served with divorce papers, a Temporary Restraining Order filed in the divorce case, and a notice of hearing in the Colorado divorce court, which will occur within two weeks.
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By: Jessica A. Bryant

At some point in nearly every Colorado family law case, the court will enter an order requiring the parties to attend some sort of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) session. The most commonly ordered and used type is mediation, which has been discussed in a prior blog post. There are several other types of Alternative Dispute Resolution that may be appropriate for your family law matter, such as arbitration, settlement conferences, or Early Neutral Assessment (ENA). This post is focuses on Early Neutral Assessment and the benefits and drawbacks of using such. However, before deciding what process to pursue for your case, it is always best to consult with your attorney to decide, together, what is course of action will be best for you.
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By: Stephen J. Plog

In custody cases, visitation, or “parenting time,” comes in many forms. This can include specific orders regarding telephonic or other electronic contact between a parent and child, such as Face Time or Skype. In the modification of orders, or otherwise.
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By Sarah T. McCain

Parties going through a Colorado family law matter, such as a divorce or custody case, often spend countless hours drafting a specific and thorough parenting schedule for their children. Each parent wants to put together a schedule which they believe meets the best interests of their children. However, parents are often not prepared for the circumstance when the child or children state their decision to stop exercising that schedule, meaning they don’t want to go for parenting time. This can be a frustrating time for the parent who is no longer receiving their planned parenting time and, when the child is an older teenager (ages 16 and above), it may even be more frustrating to learn that there may be limited options to correct the situation, despite the child still being considered a minor. However, despite limitations there are still options.
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