Strategically helping Colorado clients through divorce & custody cases

Articles Posted in Child Custody

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christmas-lights-1170712-300x225By Michelle L. Searcy

As we approach the holiday season, people experience increased anxiety.  Between coordinating family events, preparing food, and spending money beyond the normal monthly budget, everyone feels the pressure of creating life-long memories for their loved ones.  After a divorce, this pressure increases as we hope to reassure our children that holiday celebrations will still be a source of joy.  Having a well-crafted holiday parenting time schedule in your parenting plan helps to avoid unnecessary conflict during the holidays.

As with all parenting time, the best interests of the child standard in section 14-10-124, C.R.S. applies to holiday parenting time.  Of the factors the Court uses to determine the best interests of the child, two are particularly important to the issue of holiday parenting time.  First, the ability to place the needs of the child ahead of your own.  Second, the ability to encourage the sharing of love, affection and contact with the other parent.  Unfortunately, in over a decade practicing family law, I have witnessed good people become unreasonable when it comes to holidays. Continue reading

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boston-airport-1449451-300x226By: Janette Jordan

If you have an existing child custody case in Colorado, are the primary residential custodian, and are considering relocating out of state with the minor child or children, you will need to seek permission from the court or written consent from the other parent.  Even a move from one city to another (for example, Fort Collins to Colorado Springs) could be considered a relocation as it can substantially change the geographical ties between the minor child and the other parent.  C.R.S. 14-10-129 governs modifications of parenting time.  Depending upon the nature of your current parenting time 0rder, there may be different ways to approach the relocation.

When dealing with a motion for relocation, there are several factors that the court will consider in addition to the best interests of the child (C.R.S. 14-10-124).  Those standards are set forth in C.R.S. 14-10-129 and can include:  Continue reading

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law-series-4-1467436-300x226By:  Jessica A. Saldin

In prior, recent blog posts, I overviewed both the impact the federal tax changes will have on maintenance (alimony) awards starting January 2019, as well as the revisions to Colorado’s maintenance and child support laws to account for the tax code changes.  The purpose of this blog post is to provide concrete examples of the difference between the pre-August-2018 maintenance and child support laws and the new ones which started this month.  

Since the statutory changes are going to have more of an effect on maintenance awards entered after December 31, 2018 (any maintenance awards entered before that date would remain tax deductible for the payor) this blog post will use the 2019 minimum wage amount for the first scenario.  Beginning January 1, 2019, Colorado minimum wage increases to $11.10 per hour.  This is most applicable for situations where a party is not working and can be imputed income (see prior blog posts to determine when this may be appropriate). Continue reading

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hello-my-name-is-1244204-300x214By: Janette Jordan

There are two types of name changes that occur in a family law case: the restoration of the Wife’s name to her maiden name or other previous name and the changing of the name of a minor child in a divorce or custody case.

In a divorce case, if you are the party seeking to have your maiden or other name restored you should indicate such in either the divorce petition or the response, depending on your status in the case. That being said, you do not have to make the decision right away, but it helps to indicate from the beginning that this is something you are considering.  So long as you raise the issue with the court prior to the decree of dissolution entering you can change your name as part of the proceedings.  It should be noted that the other side has no say or control in terms of your requested name change.  Fortunately, statute (C.R.S. 14-10-120.2) also authorizes the filing of a request to restore a maiden name after the decree enters, should someone change their mind later on. Continue reading

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license-wall-5-1445048-300x222By: Curtis Wiberg

In our mobile society, it is not an uncommon occurrence for parents to obtain custody orders in one state, and for both parents and the children to later reside in other states, soon after.  This can make resolution of subsequent conflicts involving parenting time (visitation) complicated.

Every state in the country has adopted the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA) to address these parenting time or custody issues that involve multiple states, which gives parents and courts predictability as these multi-state issues arise.

Generally speaking, the UCCJEA provides a series of guidelines such that only one state can have subject matter jurisdiction or authority to determine custody orders at a time.  This is known as the “home state”, and it is usually determined by the state where a minor child has resided for the most recent six continuous months prior to the initial court custody filing.  Once a state assumes home state jurisdiction, that home state has exclusive home state jurisdiction to modify custody orders until such time as both parents and the children no longer reside in the home state, or because the home state becomes an inconvenient forum and gives up it’s exclusive jurisdiction.   Interstate jurisdictional authorization for a court to establish, modify, or enforce a child custody order differs, depending on the circumstances. Continue reading

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running-girl-and-endless-green-meadows-1430721-300x200By: Jessica A. Bryant

There has been a recent push in Colorado by parents requesting a free range parenting law.  This type of law was recently passed in Utah (the first state to pass such a law).  The reasoning for such type of law is to provide some sort of clarity for parents that want to teach their children more independence without the risk of being charged with child abuse or neglect.  In Colorado, the child abuse/neglect laws are vague, which allows the Department of Human Services to exercise discretion in an investigation when deciding if something should be pursued as child abuse or neglect, or not.  For example, Colorado does not have a specific age as to when a child can be left home alone- it is simply judged on a reasonableness standard.  However, that same vagueness creates uncertainty for parents that want to allow their children freedom to exercise independence by walking home from school or riding their bike to the park, for example.  If passed, this type of law would have obvious effects on child abuse and neglect cases.  However, it could also have effects on Colorado divorce and custody cases.  Continue reading

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listen-1257756-300x226By:  Sarah T. McCain

During the end of a marriage, there can often be a significant amount of fighting. It’s hoped that these verbal arguments couples might engage in can be kept from the children.  As a marriage ends through the process of divorce, children often comment that it is better that they not be caught in the middle of the fighting. This is a goal I recommend all clients strive for and something the court will certainly expect tied into one facet of the C.R.S. 14-10-124 “best interest of the child” standard: the ability of the parents to put the needs of the child over their own.  However, what happens when the conflict continues and what can you do to make sure that this continued hostility does not impact your parenting relationship or the emotional health of your children?  Continue reading

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priority-mental-health-1546123-300x224By: Janette Jordan 

Divorce is an extremely emotionally taxing and difficult process. It affects both parties directly involved, and then the children. A divorce is essentially a fracturing of a family unit. One household now becomes two. One shared holiday now becomes split or alternated. The reality is that it is okay to seek outside help; and it is encouraged. For us divorce lawyers, divorce is a common occurrence and something we deal with literally every day (weekends and holidays excepted).  For you, the person going through the divorce, you are having to deal with a whole new set of issues, such as the legal aspect of your case, the emotional separation and loss, the uncertainty of the future, and maintaining stability for your children.  One of the best things you can do for them is to ensure they have a safe emotional outlet in which to participate and engage, such as therapy.

There are many approaches to therapy depending upon your unique situation and the age of your children. Most psychologists recognize that the time following the divorce is the hardest time for a child. The discussion, realization, and/or physical separation in the beginning can be traumatizing and upsetting, but a lot of the research suggests it is how the parents help their children navigate this transition that determines lasting psychological effects.  Continue reading

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mother-reading-a-book-to-children-1438086-300x199By:   Sarah T. McCain

There are many ways in which the third parties in your life may impact a child custody determination. It is important to carefully weigh each role these individuals play in your life and the interaction they have with your child(ren).  Friends, neighbors, romantic partners, and family members could impact your child custody case.   Each of these individuals could not only be called to testify, but could also be interviewed by a child custody expert, such as Child and Family Investigators (CFI) or Parental Responsibilities Evaluators (PRE).   Negative things any of them do could be used against you when it comes time to determine things like residential custody or parenting time.  When starting parenting time or child custody litigation, it’s always a good idea to think about who’s going to be around your kids and what effect that interaction could have. Continue reading

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New-Year-300x200By: Janette Jordan

New Years 2018 is upon us.  It’s that time of year again for reflection and new beginnings. We all have room to grow and improve, especially when you’re attempting to co-parent through a divorce, or even after. The holidays can be an especially difficult time and every person’s situation is different.  Poor and negative communication can only make the situation work.   Today, there are many ways of communicating, whether via phone, email, text, or a third party parental communication site.   Regardless of the media, how things are stated still matters, and venom can also come through in written words.  When it comes to communicating with your ex about the kids, here are some things to consider.

Tone & Language:  I tell every client that comes through my door, “communicate with the other party as if a judge is looking over your shoulder,” because typically, that’s what will end up happening when you have a dispute that the courts need to resolve. No matter how frustrated you may get, you should avoid using derogatory language, even if the other side “started it first”. Poor parenting behavior is often the first accusation made in contested child custody cases and you want to make sure your communications do not support that. Only you can control how you respond. Continue reading